sausage making

Meat Curing Plus Sausage Making Information Part 4

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SAUSAGE MAKING

Secrets of sausage making; How to make all kinds of sausage and comply with the pure food laws.

 

HOW TO CURE MEAT FOR MAKING FINE BOLOGNA AND FRANKFURT SAUSAGE AND COMPLY WITH PURE FOOD LAWS

In following the old method of making Bologna and Frankfurt Sausage, a large percentage of the albumen is drawn out of the Meat, thus losing much of the richness, flavor, and color which should be retained in the Sausage.

B. Heller & Co. have made an important improvement in the process of curing trimmings, and Sausage Makers will find it greatly to their advantage to make an immediate trial of this process. A single batch of Sausage made after this method will convince any Sausage Maker of the mistake of following the old ideas of making Bologna and Frankfurt Sausages.

When Bologna and Frankfurts are made from fresh Meats, they have a gray color and are very difficult to keep in good condition, especially during the warm weather.

However, when Bologna and Frankfurts are made by the Freeze-Em-Pickle Process, they will have a fine red color and they will comply with the Pure Food Laws because Freeze-Em-Pickle contains no ingredients which have been prohibited by any of the food laws.

They will also keep much better than when made in the old way and will stand shipment during the warm weather with better results. 

 

HOW TO CURE BEEF OR PORK TRIMMINGS WITH FREEZE-EM-PICKLE

Trimmings that are to be stored away for a few days to two weeks, should be packed with the following proportions of Freeze-Em-Pickle and Salt.

To every 100 lbs. of Trimmings use the following:

1 lb. of Freeze-Em-Pickle.
1 lb. of Salt.

For Trimmings that are to be stored away for two weeks to three months, the following proportions of Freeze-Em-Pickle and Salt should be used:

1¼ lbs. of Freeze-Em-Pickle and
1 lb. of Salt to each
100 lbs. of Trimmings.

For Trimmings that are to be stored away for three months to six months, the following proportions of Freeze-Em-Pickle and Salt should be used:

1½ lbs. of Freeze-Em-Pickle and
1 lb. of Salt to each
100 lbs. of Trimmings.

First:—Weigh the Trimmings and then spread them on a table.

Second:—Weigh out the proper proportions of Freeze-Em-Pickle and Salt, mix them together thoroughly, and then sprinkle over the meat.

Third:—Mix the Trimmings well so that the Salt and Freeze-Em-Pickle get to all parts of the meat.

Fourth:—Run the Trimmings through the grinder, using what is called the lard plate, a plate that has holes in it from 1 to 1¼ inches in diameter. By first mixing the Freeze-Em-Pickle and Salt with the meat and then putting it through the grinder, the Freeze-Em-Pickle and Salt become better mixed with the meat.

Another way is to run the Trimmings through the grinder first, using the lard plate with 1 to 1¼ inch holes in it; then put this meat in the mixer, and while mixing add the Freeze-Em-Pickle and Salt, which have first been thoroughly mixed. Let the mixer run until the Freeze-Em-Pickle and Salt are thoroughly mixed with the meat, which only takes a few minutes.

If a plate with large holes in it is not available, cut the Trimmings up small by hand and then mix the Freeze-Em-Pickle and Salt with the meat. 

 

HOW TO PACK IN BARRELS OR TIERCES

First:—Take barrels or tierces that are perfectly clean and sweet; this is very important. Then sprinkle a handful of Freeze-Em-Pickle and Salt which have first been thoroughly mixed, over the bottom of the tierce.

Second:—Fill tierce about one-quarter full of the meat that has been mixed with Freeze-Em-Pickle and Salt, and then with a tamper, tamp it down as tight as can be. The tighter the meat is packed, the better. Then place more of the meat into the tierce and tamp it, and keep on doing this until the tierce is full.

Third:—If the tierce is not to be headed up, don’t fill it quite to the top, and after tamping the meat tight, sprinkle a couple of handfuls of the mixture of Freeze-Em-Pickle and Salt over the top. Then lay a piece of parchment paper over the meat, and on top of this place a piece of cheesecloth about a yard square.

Fourth:—On top of the cheesecloth put about two or three inches of dry Salt, spread so it reaches to all the edges of the barrel, so as to exclude the air from the meat, and then turn the ends of the cloth over the top, and allow this meat to stay in the cooler until you are ready to make Bologna, Frankfurts, or any similar sausage out of it.

This meat is now ready in four or five days to be made into Bologna, Frankfurts, or any similar sausage, but can also remain in a cooler as long as six months or even longer without being disturbed. This meat will not become too salty no matter how long it stands, and whenever you wish to make Bologna, Frankfurts, or any similar sausage, the meat is ready to be used.

This is known as the Freeze-Em-Pickle Process, and by curing the meat in this way no brine or albumen will be found at the bottom of the tierce when the meat is taken out. The meat when taken from the barrel will be found sticky, and to possess good binding quality and a nice cured flavor. It will make delicious Bologna, Frankfurts, or any similar sausage.

The meat will have a nice sweet cure and a fine color which will be imparted to the Bologna, Frankfurts, or any similar sausage made from it. On account of the meat being cured, the Bologna, Frankfurts, and other sausages will not spoil so easily as they would if made from fresh meat.

Beef or pork trimmings should be handled in the same way, and no fresh meat used at all in making the Bologna or Frankfurts.

If the trimmings are to be kept for any length of time, it is advisable to head them up. When tierces are to be 113 headed up, fill them as full as possible, sprinkle two handfuls of Freeze-Em-Pickle and salt, which have first been thoroughly mixed, over the top and then put on the head.

When making this Freeze-Em-Pickle cured meat into smoked sausages, more salt of course must be added, as the meat is not sufficiently salty, so when adding the Seasoning add sufficient salt to give it the proper taste, and add ½ lb. of sugar to every 100 lbs. of meat in addition to the spice, as it gives the meat a delicious flavor.

 

PROPER TEMPERATURE FOR STORING TRIMMINGS

If the trimmings are to be used up in two or three weeks, any ordinary cooler that is kept around 40 degrees will be sufficient, but if trimmings are to be kept three to six months, they should be kept in a cooler at a temperature of 35 to 36 degrees to get the best results. Never let the temperature get down below freezing if it can be helped, and do not let it get any higher than 38 degrees, if possible.

 

HOW TO MAKE BOLOGNA AND FRANKFURTS FROM FRESH BEEF AND PORK WITH FREEZE-EM-PICKLE WITHOUT FIRST CURING THE MEAT

Run the desired quantity of beef and pork through a grinder, first using a coarse plate, then through a fine one; then finish in a silent chopper. While cutting it in the silent cutter, add to every 100 lbs. of meat 1 lb. of Freeze-Em-Pickle, ¾ lb. of “B” Condimentine, 1 to 1½ lbs. of salt, and ½ lb. of sugar, according to taste.

Chop this up, as usual, adding pure artificial ice to keep it cool. First, put the beef in the silent cutter, and when it is about three-fourths fine add the necessary pork, which has first been run through the ¼ inch plate of a grinder. If a mixer is not used, add the Seasonings and flour to the meat in the silent cutter.

When all are thoroughly mixed put into a tub, cover well over with parchment or wax paper to exclude the air, and put away until ready to use. The meat can then be taken directly from the tub in 24 to 36 hours, placed into the stuffer, and stuffed into the casings.

The meat should be kept at a temperature of 45 to 46 degrees. This is a fairly high temperature which gives the Freeze-Em-Pickle a chance to do its work quicker, and by standing 24 to 36 hours after it is chopped and seasoned, it develops its full binding qualities and saves handling the meat two or three times, which should appeal to every sausage maker. 

 

FORMULA FOR BOLOGNA SAUSAGE

The following formula makes very fine Bologna sausage:

75 lbs. beef trimmings cured by Freeze-Em-Pickle Process.
15 lbs. pork trimmings cured by Freeze-Em-Pickle Process.
10 lbs. pork speck (back fat).

Bull-Meat-Brand Sausage Binder in the percentage amount of cereal allowed by your State Food Law, but not over five pounds to the hundred.

8 to 10 ounces Zanzibar-Brand Bologna Sausage Flavor.
¾ lb. “B” Condimentine
Sufficient cracked ice for cooling.

First:—Salt the pork and beef trimmings according to the directions on the foregoing information.

Second:—When making the Bologna (or Frankfurts), take the beef that has been cured with Freeze-Em-Pickle and run through the grinder, using a ¼ or ⅜ inch plate. (Some sausage makers prefer to run this meat through the grinder again, using the smallest plate they have, but this in our opinion takes up unnecessary time and labor. Once running through a ¼ or ⅜ inch plate is sufficient).

Then place this beef in the silent chopper. As soon as this has made one or two revolutions, put in sufficient cracked ice to prevent the beef from becoming heated. Then add about one pound of salt; adding ice if necessary. Then add the pork to the beef, which should have already been run through the grinder, and at the same time add the pork speck.

Third:—Then for seasoning add 8 to 10 ounces Zanzibar-Brand Bologna Flavor, and also about ¾ of a pound of “B” Condimentine.

This Condimental preparation is permissible in all Government inspected houses and complies with the Pure Food Laws. “B” Condimentine is used to prevent shrinkage and help keep the sausage, and so the color inside will not fade or turn gray but retain its bright, rich color for ten days if kept under proper conditions.

This is a great advantage, especially to large packers who do shipping. After the Spices and Condimentine are worked in, then add salt to taste. Sausage made with “B” Condimentine does not have to be labeled that a preservative is used.

Fourth:—Then while the meat is being cut in the silent chopper, add the legal amount of Bull-Meat-Brand Sausage Binder to every 100 pounds of meat. Or, if a mixer is used, add the binder to the mixer.

When properly mixed and seasoned with spices and “B” Condimentine, and binder has been added, it is already for the stuffer, or if desired, this meat already chopped can be kept in tubs in a cooler of a temperature of 38 to 40 degrees for 24 to 36 hours until required.

Notice:—See our instructions for handling beef that has been cured with Freeze-Em-Pickle and stored away for two to six months or longer.

Note:—Since the Pure Food Laws have been enacted, all Antiseptic Preservatives have been ruled out and cannot be used in sausage, so sausage makers must be careful what kind of a Sausage Binder they use in their sausage. Many of the binders on the market start fermentation soon after moisture is added to them.

When it is noticed that Bologna does not keep as well as it should, the first thing to be looked to is the binder used, as invariably a binder which is not free from the germs of fermentation will cause trouble, and the losses a butcher has from using such binders will amount to more than the saving in the cost of the binder.

Many cheap binders can be bought for less money than Bull-Meat-Brand Sausage Binder, as they cost less to manufacture.

We are not trying to see how cheap a binder we can manufacture, but our sole aim in selling Bull-Meat-Brand Sausage Binder is to offer the very Finest Binder that we know how to make, which will help the sausage instead of souring it, and, even if our price is a trifle higher, Bull-Meat-Brand Sausage Binder is much cheaper to use and results are always satisfactory. 

Notice:—If a Garlic flavor is desired, add one or two tablespoonfuls of Vacuum-Brand Garlic Compound while the meat is being chopped.

Vacuum-Brand Garlic Compound is recommended as it does not sour in the sausage and it does not leave any after-taste nor taint the breath, because it is so finely divided that it is thoroughly incorporated in the meats and is thoroughly digested and absorbed. In States where Cereal is not permitted, use Garlic Condiment instead of Garlic Compound.

Fifth:—After the meat is chopped to the proper fineness, stuff it into beef rounds or beef middles. Place the sausage in the smokehouse and smoke.

 

BOILING BOLOGNA

After it is smoked, boil Round Bologna for 30 minutes in water 160 degrees Fahrenheit and Long Bologna for 45 to 60 minutes in 160 degrees water, according to thickness.

After they are boiled place them on a table, or hang them up and pour boiling water over them to wash off the grease. Then pour cold water over them to shrink the casings. After that allow them to cool in the open air or a well-ventilated room, before placing them in the cooler or icebox. This will prevent sweating, which causes moldy and slimy casings.

 

BOILING LARGE BOLOGNA

If Large Bologna is desired, stuff the meat into beef bungs and smoke until they are nicely smoked, then boil them from 1¼ to 1½ hours in water 155 degrees Fahrenheit. Vary the time of boiling according to the thickness of the Bologna.

 

SALTING FAT FOR BOLOGNA

The Pork Back Fat or Pork Speck will be much better for use in Bologna and Frankfurts if it is dry salted with Freeze-Em-Pickle for a few weeks before it is used


COLORING BOLOGNA CASINGS

Hang the bologna in the smokehouse just long enough to dry the skin well, or hang it in front of a hot fire, or in the sun, any way to get the excess moisture dried out of the casing; then proceed according to the following method:

METHOD OF COLORING THE CASINGS OF SAUSAGE IN GOVERNMENT INSPECTED PACKING HOUSES

In all Packing Houses having U. S. Government inspection, the coloring of casings is allowed only by what is termed “Momentary Dipping”. We advise butchers to use this method in preference to any other way whether they have Government inspection or not.

Directions for Momentarily Dipping Smoked Sausage such as Bologna, Frankfurt, etc.

After Sausage has been smoked and cooked, dip it into a solution made up in the proportion of 1 ounce of Zanzibar-Carbon-Brand Casing Brown Mixture to every 20 gallons of water. Always dissolve it first in some hot water (not boiling) in the proportion of one-half gallon water for every ounce used and then pour this solution into the balance of the water to make up the dipping solution.

The water used for dipping should be about the same temperature as that in which the Sausage is cooked. After dipping, the Sausage must be rinsed off with hot water and thereafter with cold water, then hung up in the usual manner to drip off and dry.

When Sausage is smoked through and is not cooked, it must be well sprayed with, or dipped into, boiling hot water to remove the grease from the casing before being put into the colored dipping solution.

 

FRANKFORT SAUSAGE; HOW TO MAKE

Frankfort Sausage is made in most cases in exactly the same manner as Bologna with the exception that it is chopped very fine and Zanzibar-Brand Frankfort Sausage Seasoning is used. To make fine Frankfort Sausage use two parts of Beef and one part of Pork.

If Veal is used in Frankfort Sausage, it improves it considerably, but the price of Veal is so high that it is very seldom used. Stuff in sheep casings and smoke lightly, then dip them in Zanzibar-Carbon Brand Casing Brown Mixture by the method prescribed on the preceding page.

Dipping them in hot water and then in cold takes out all the wrinkles. After they have been dipped, pour a pail of hot water over them to wash off all adhering grease; then dip them for a minute or two in ice water to cool. This will make them contract so rapidly that they will not wrinkle; then put in a cooler to hang up and cool through to the center. 

 

COLORING FRANKFURT SAUSAGE CASINGS

Follow the directions given for momentary dipping.

If a deep color is desired, slightly increase the amount of Zanzibar-Carbon Brand Mixture. You must use your own judgment in producing the right color desired, as the drier the casing the less Zanzibar-Carbon Brand Mixture it takes and the better the color will be.

Always be particular not to smoke with too much heat in the smokehouse, so that the grease does not melt in the sausage and come through the casing.

 

CURING BEEF CHEEKS FOR BOLOGNA AND FRANKFURTS

First:—The Cheek Meat should be cut out of the heads as soon as possible after the beef is killed, and the gristle should be cut through lengthwise, two or three times. All the fat can also be trimmed off or left on, just as desired; in a large slaughtering establishment, the fat is worth more in the tank than in the sausage.

Second:—The Cheeks should then be thrown into ice water and allowed to remain there for an hour or two. This will draw out all the slime and blood.

Third:—The Cheeks should then be spread out thinly on coarse wire screens, or on perforated galvanized iron pans, in a cooler. They should be spread out as thinly as possible so as to thoroughly drain and chill.

Fourth:—After they are thoroughly chilled, which will take 24 hours, they should be salted as follows:

 

DIRECTIONS FOR DRY SALTING BEEF AND PORK CHEEK MEAT

Beef and Pork Cheek Meat that is to be stored away for a few days to two weeks, should be packed with the following proportions of Freeze-Em-Pickle and salt.

To every 100 lbs. of Beef and Pork Cheek Meat use the following:

1 lb. of Freeze-Em-Pickle.
1 lb. of Salt.

For Beef and Pork Cheek Meat that is to be stored away for two weeks to three months, the following proportions of Freeze-Em-Pickle and salt should be used:

1¼ lbs. of Freeze-Em-Pickle and
1 lb. of Salt to each
100 lbs. of Beef and Pork Cheek Meat.

For Beef and Pork Cheek Meat that is to be stored away for three months to six months, the following proportions of Freeze-Em-Pickle and salt should be used:

1½ lbs. of Freeze-Em-Pickle and
1 lb. of Salt to each
100 lbs. of Beef and Pork Cheek Meat.

First:—Weigh the Beef and Pork Cheek Meat and then spread it on a table.

Second:—Weigh out the proper proportions of Freeze-Em-Pickle and salt, mix them together thoroughly, and then sprinkle over the meat.

Third:—Mix the Beef and Pork Cheek Meat well so that the salt and Freeze-Em-Pickle get to all parts of the meat.

Fourth:—Run the Beef and Pork Cheek Meat through the grinder, using what is called the lard plate, a plate that has holes in it from 1 to 1¼ inches in diameter. By first mixing the Freeze-Em-Pickle and salt with the meat and then putting it through the grinder, the Freeze-Em-Pickle and salt become better mixed with the meat.

Another way is to run the Beef and Pork Cheek Meat through the grinder first, using the lard plate with 1 to 1¼ inch holes in it; then put this meat in the mixer and while mixing add the Freeze-Em-Pickle and salt, which have first been thoroughly mixed. Let the mixer run until the Freeze-Em-Pickle and salt become thoroughly mixed with the meat, which only takes a few minutes.

If a plate with large holes in it is not available, cut the Beef and Pork Cheek Meat up small by hand and then mix the Freeze-Em-Pickle and salt with the meat. 121

Fifth:—If the tierces are to remain open, they can be covered with a clean cloth and a layer about two or three inches thick of dry salt should be put over the top of the cloth. This will exclude the air and keep the top meat from getting dry and dark.

Sixth:—Cheek Meat that has been properly chilled and packed in this manner can be kept for any length of time and need not be overhauled. It can be kept for a year or longer and whenever it is taken out of the barrel and used, it will make fine Bologna and Frankforts with fine color and a delicious flavor.

Dry salted Cheek Meat makes much better Bologna than the pickled Cheek Meat. Sometimes Cheeks are very low in price, and they can be packed and stored as above directed and kept until the market advances; by this method, quite a sum of money can be made each year.

Seventh:—See paragraph on Temperature for Curing Meats in Part 1.

 

CURING BEEF AND PORK HEARTS FOR BOLOGNA AND OTHER SAUSAGE

First:—As soon as the beef or hog is slaughtered, the hearts should be cut open; the pork hearts should be cut into four squares, and the beef hearts into six or eight pieces, being sure to cut them so that all the crevices are open and exposed. They should then be placed in ice water in which they should be allowed to remain for two to three hours.

Second:—Spread the hearts on trays or racks in a cooler as thinly as possible, and allow them to drain and chill for 24 hours; they must be thoroughly chilled so that all animal heat leaves them.

Use for 100 lbs. of  Beef or Pork Hearts

1¼ lbs. Freeze-Em-Pickle

1 lb. of Common Salt

Third:—Run hearts through an Enterprise grinder, using a lard plate with 1½-inch holes; then place in a mixer and gradually add the mixture of Freeze-Em-Pickle and salt. Be sure it is evenly divided and thoroughly mixed. 

Fourth:—Take a perfectly clean tierce, and sprinkle a handful of salt, and a little Freeze-Em-Pickle on the bottom; put the salted hearts into the tierce and tamp them down with a tamper as hard as possible.

The object in tamping with a tamper is to get all the air out and to close up all the cavities in the barrel. The less air cells in the barrel, the better the hearts will cure and keep.

Fifth:—If the tierces are to be headed up, sprinkle a handful of salt on top of the tierces, cover nicely with a piece of parchment paper, and put in the heads, being careful that the tierces are as full as they possibly can be before the heads are put in, and also that the tierces are perfectly sweet before packing.

Sixth:—If the tierces are to remain open, they can be covered with a cloth and about two or three inches of dry salt should be put over the top of the cloth. This will exclude the air and will keep the top meat from getting dry and dark.

Seventh:—Hearts that have been properly chilled and packed in this manner can be kept for any length of time and need not be overhauled. They can be kept for a year or longer, and whenever taken out of the tierces to use, they will make fine bologna and such sausage as hearts can be used for.

Quite a quantity of properly cured hearts can be used in the manufacture of sausage with very good results. They will have a fine color and a delicious flavor.

Hearts should never be pickled for Bologna, but should always be dry salted as above directed. It is very often the case that hearts can be bought at a small cost when the market is low, and if so purchased and packed and stored as herein directed until the market advances and meat is high, they can be made into bologna with a very handsome profit.

Eighth:—See paragraph on Temperature for Curing Meats in Part 1.

 

GERMAN-STYLE HAM SAUSAGE

German Style Ham Sausage is made very much like Bologna, except that the meat should be chopped finer. For every 100 lbs. of Ham Sausage, take the following:

50 lbs. of Pork Trimmings.
40 lbs. of Beef Trimmings.
5 lbs. of Pork Speck (Back Fat).
Bull-Meat-Brand Sausage Binder in the percentage proportion of cereal allowed by your State Food Law.
¾ lb. “B” Condimentine.
2 lbs. of Salt.
6 to 8 ounces Zanzibar-Brand Frankfort Flavor.

First:—Salt the Pork and Beef Trimmings four or five days ahead, using to every 100 lbs. of meat 1 lb. of Freeze-Em-Pickle. No salt or anything in addition to the Freeze-Em-Pickle should be added when the meat is put down to cure. The salt is added when the Sausage is made.

Second:—When making Ham Sausage, use the Pork and Beef in the proportions as stated above, and when about half chopped add the Speck or Back Fat.

Third:—After adding the Fat, add sufficient salt so as to have 2 lbs. to each 100 lbs. of finished Ham Sausage. Also, add 6 to 8 ounces Frankfort Flavor.

Fourth:—Now proceed to chop or grind the meat according to directions given on ‘Formula For Bologna Sausage’, using cracked ice to keep the meat cool. 

Fifth:—When the meat is chopped, stuff it into Beef Bung Casings. After the Sausage is stuffed, it is well to wrap the string around it tight, so the Sausage will be firm when cooked and will not drop in the smokehouse.

Sixth:—Smoke this sausage carefully over a medium warm fire.

Seventh:—Cook the Sausage from 1¼ to 1½ hours, in water 155 degrees hot. Vary the time according to the thickness of the Sausage. See directions on ‘Coloring Bologna Casings’ and color the casings of this Sausage the same way.

Eighth:—After Sausage of any kind has been cooked, it should be handled as follows: Pour boiling water over it to wash off the surplus grease that adheres to the casings and then pour cold water over it to shrink and close the pores of the casings. This is very important and it should be closely observed by all packers and sausage makers who wish to have their Sausage look nice and fresh in appearance.

 

HOW TO PREPARE CASINGS BEFORE STUFFING

Before casings are stuffed, they should always be soaked in warm water, so as to make them pliable, so they will stretch to their utmost limit when being stuffed. If they are properly soaked, they will stretch considerably and will not burst as easily as they will if they are not properly soaked.

The casings should be soaked in water at about 90 degrees temperature Fahrenheit, from one to two hours, depending upon how old and dry they are. If the casings are very old and dry, they will have to be soaked until they are perfectly soft and pliable.

When casings are soaked in water that is too hot, the casings are scalded and become tender and will burst when being stuffed, and the heavy Sausage will tear loose in the smokehouse. 

 

HOW TO PREVENT BURSTING AND SHRINKING OF SAUSAGE

Many undergo a great deal of trouble from the bursting and shrinking of Sausage and it is trouble which can be easily avoided, as it is entirely owing to the manner of boiling the Sausage.

Ordinary round or long Bologna should be kept in water at 160 to 170 degrees Fahrenheit for about 30 minutes, and thick: large Bologna should be kept in water from 155 to 160 degrees Fahrenheit from three-quarters of an hour to one hour, according to the size.

If the Sausage is very large, it will take from one and one-quarter to one and one-half hours to cook them thoroughly. When Sausage is boiled in water that is too hot the particles of meat will crumble and separate.

The Sausage will taste dry, although water will be in the crevices between the small pieces of meat. The Sausage will look rough on the outside and will also lose more weight than when boiled as above directed. Many of them will burst when the water is too hot.

After Sausage of any kind has been cooked, it should be handled as follows: Pour boiling water over it to wash off all the surplus grease that adheres to the casing and then pour cold water over it to shrink and close the pores of the casing. This is very important and should be closely observed by all packers and sausage makers who wish to have their Sausage look nice and keep its fresh appearance. 

 

HOW TO SEASON HAMBURGER SO AS TO MAKE IT MORE PALATABLE AND PLEASING

A very successful way of increasing trade on Hamburger is to season it with one ounce of Zanzibar-Brand Hamburger Seasoning to every 25 pounds of meat.

This gives the meat a Delicious Flavor, makes it more Palatable and Pleasing to the Taste, and much more Appetizing and Satisfactory to the Customer. Sometimes Hamburger, when made without Seasoning, has a peculiar flavor and meat odor which many customers object to.

All this trouble is overcome by Seasoning all Hamburger with our Zanzibar Brand Hamburger Seasoning, as it gives the meat a Delicious Flavor and Aroma.

This is something that will increase the sale of Hamburger wherever it is used. 

 

HAMBURGER SAUSAGE

Below we give the recipe for a New Sausage that is well-liked wherever it is being tried, and we advise every butcher to make use of it. This Sausage is a success, takes well with the trade when made upright, and is very easy to make.

It is a nice eating Sausage and customers are always pleased to get hold of something new for a change. Making Hamburger Sausage gives the butcher an opportunity for selling all the small pieces of beef and a large percentage of beef fat at a good profit, which is very often not easily sold otherwise.

 

DIRECTIONS FOR MAKING HAMBURGER SAUSAGE

Take

70 lbs. Beef Trimmings.
20 lbs. Beef Fat.
Bull-Meat-Brand Sausage Binder in the percentage proportion of cereal allowed by your State Food Law.
20 lbs. Water.
6 to 8 ozs. Zanzibar Brand Hamburger Seasoning.
1 lb. Freeze-Em-Pickle.
2 or 3 large size Onions.
2 lbs. Salt.

First:—Take the 70 lbs. of Beef Trimmings and trim out all the sinew and cut them into small pieces.

Second:—Spread the meat on a table and sprinkle over it 1 lb. of Freeze-Em-Pickle to 70 lbs. meat. Mix it thoroughly so that the Freeze-Em-Pickle gets to all parts of the meat and then run the meat through a sausage grinder, through a medium fine plate, so as to 128 cut the meat into small pieces, so that the Freeze-Em-Pickle is thoroughly mixed with the meat.

Then place it in the cooler in tubs or boxes not deeper than six inches and allow it to remain there from one to two days to cure. It is better to allow the meat to cure for two days or longer.

Third:—After the Beef is cured take 20 lbs. of Suet or Beef Fat, from the Brisket is the best, cut it up with 2 or 3 large Onions and run the Beef Fat and Onions through the meat grinder and grind it very fine, then mix the ground Beef Fat with the 70 lbs. of Cured Beef.

Fourth:—Put Legal amount of Bull-Meat-Brand Sausage Binder, 6 to 8 ozs. Zanzibar-Brand Hamburger Seasoning and 2 lbs. of Salt in a pail and add 20 lbs. of cold water. After mixing, add this to the ground Beef and Suet.

Fifth:—Mix the Beef, Suet, Bull-Meat-Brand Sausage Binder, Seasoning, Salt, and water together as well as possible and then run it through the meat grinder again.

Notice:—Hamburger Sausage can also be made without curing the meat in advance if one prefers.

Simply mix the Beef, Fat, Bull-Meat-Brand Sausage Binder, Hamburger Seasoning, Finely Cut-Up Onions, Freeze-Em-Pickle and Salt all together, run it through a Grinder and add the water while grinding and mixing, and when ground it is ready for sale. This sausage will, however, have a different flavor than when made of cured meat as above.

Sixth:—After the Sausage is ground, spread it out on a platter, decorate it nicely with parsley, a few pieces of sliced lemon or orange, which adds to its attractiveness.

With each can of Hamburger Seasoning we furnish some of these cards free. Take a beef skewer, split the end of it so the card can be put into the slit and then stick this skewer into the platter of Hamburger Sausage.

This little card will help the sale and you will be surprised at the many compliments you will receive on this new Sausage. We will gladly furnish as many as are desired of these cards free of charge to any butcher who is using our Hamburger Seasoning. 

 

DIRECTIONS FOR MAKING FRESH PORK SAUSAGE

Take 100 lbs. of Fresh Pork Trimmings and while chopping add

Bull-Meat-Brand Sausage Binder in the percentage proportion of cereal allowed by your State Pure Food Law.

¾ to 1 lb. “A” Condimentine.
1 lb. Salt.
8 to 10 ounces Zanzibar-Brand Pork Flavor.

Use sufficient cracked ice to keep the mixture cold. This will make a most delicious pork sausage.

When this is properly mixed it is ready for the stuffer. Pork Sausage should be stuffed into hog casings, or it may be simply put up in bulk.

Note:—By using the above quantity of “A” Condimentine to every 100 lbs. of trimmings, it will prevent fresh pork sausage from turning sour or gray for several days, if kept under proper conditions and at a low temperature.

It keeps the pork sausage in a firm, fresh condition. “A” Condimentine does not alter or affect the color of the sausage meat, but simply enables the meat to retain its own natural color.

The use of this harmless condimental preparation is a great advantage to all packers and sausage manufacturers, especially when the sausage is shipped distances or is delivered from wagons to the small retailers. “A” Condimentine is guaranteed to comply with the Pure Food Laws and the Federal Meat Inspection Law.

Its use is permitted in all U. S. Government Inspected Packing Houses. Sausage does not have to be labeled 130 to show the presence of a preservative when “A” Condimentine is used.

There are many kinds of Flours and Binders on the market, but the Sausage Maker will find Bull-Meat-Brand Sausage Binder to be thoroughly reliable, especially for Pork Sausage, as it does not so easily sour or ferment and it makes an emulsion of the fat and water, and when the Sausage is fried the grease and meat juices will not fry out of it readily but will remain in the Sausage.

Pork Sausage made with Bull-Meat-Brand Sausage Binder is much more easily digested than when made without it, because the fat goes into the stomach in the form of an emulsion when it is eaten, and in this way is more easily digested and absorbed.

In using a Binder for Sausage, if it is the Butcher’s desire to turn out a Fine-Flavored Sausage and one that is juicy when eaten, it is very important that he be very careful what kind of a Binder he uses. There are many Binders on the market, sold simply for the purpose of making money, which are utterly worthless.

They make the Sausage dry and instead of improving the quality of the Sausage, they are a great detriment to it. If the Butcher takes pride in his goods and wants to make Sausage that his trade will like, he should not buy these Binders, as he is simply throwing his money away and spoiling his goods by using them.

Therefore, it is always advisable when buying from jobbers to insist upon getting the Genuine B. Heller & Co.’s Bull-Meat-Brand Flour, as you will then know exactly what you are getting, as our guaranty is on every package.

 

SMOKED PORK SAUSAGE

Pork Sausage not sold the day it is made may be smoked the following day and sold for Smoked Pork Sausage.

Pork Sausage smoked the day after it is made will keep much better than when they are smoked as soon as made, because Sausage that has been kept in a cooler for 24 hours after being made are thoroughly cured, so they will stand the heat of the smokehouse and will have an entirely different flavor than if they are subjected to the heat when the meat is fresh and is not fully cured. 

 

HOW TO CURE MEAT FOR HEAD CHEESE

The proper way to make Head Cheese is to make it from Cured Meat only, and all the Heads and Meat used for it should be cured for 10 to 14 days in a brine made as follows:

1 lb. Freeze-Em-Pickle.
7 lbs. of Salt.
5 gals. Water.

Head Cheese made from Meat cured by this process will have a fine red color and will keep well under proper conditions in warm weather. Always add Bull-Meat-Brand Sausage Binder to Head Cheese, as it makes it firm and combines with the fats and juices of the meat, so as to keep the Head Cheese from drying out and thereby losing its flavor.

 

DIRECTIONS FOR MAKING HEAD CHEESE

The proper meat to use for making Head Cheese is that which has been cured by the Freeze-Em-Pickle Process, as above described, but it can also be made from fresh meat if desired. It will, however, be much better and will keep for a longer time if made from meat cured by the Freeze-Em-Pickle Process.

First:—Boil the Heads slowly, and long enough so that the meat can be easily stripped from the bone. 132

Second:—Boil the Hog Rinds and the Hog Fat in nets at the same time as when boiling the heads. When the Rinds are almost cooked through, remove them from the kettle and chop or grind them fine. The Fat when cooked, should be cut up into 1¼ to 1½ inch square blocks.

Third:—Also boil about 15 lbs. of Cured Hog Tongues, and when they are cooked, cut them into strips.

Fourth:—The proper proportions for making good Head Cheese are as follows, but, the quantity of the different kinds of meat can be varied according to the stock on hand:

10 lbs. of Fresh Hog Back Fat.
15 lbs. of Cured Hog Tongues.
25 lbs. of Hog Rinds.
60 lbs. Cured Hog Head Meat (after removal from bone).
Bull-Meat-Brand Sausage Binder in proportion as allowed of cereal by your State Pure Food Law, but not over 5 pounds.
1 lb. of “A” Condimentine.
1 lb. of White Berliner Brand Konservirung Salt.

If any salt is needed add sufficient to suit the taste. If the meat is fully cured, no salt needs to be added.

Fifth:—The 60 lbs. of Head Meat must be cut into small pieces ½ to ¾ inch in size, either by hand or by machine.

Sixth:—The Rinds must be cut fine; the finer the better.

Seventh:—The Tongues must be cut into strips. The more Tongues used, the better will be the Head Cheese.

Eighth:—Mix thoroughly together the Tongues, Rinds, Head Meat, Bull-Meat-Brand Sausage Binder, the Prepared Head Cheese Seasoning, and 1 lb. “A” Condimentine. At the same time mix into the Meat as much of the water in which the meat was boiled as the Meat will absorb while being mixed.

This water, in which the Heads have been cooked, contains Gelatine which has been drawn out of the meat while boiling, and this water congeals like Jelly when it becomes cold.

The more of this water put into Head Cheese the better it will be, therefore add all of it that the meat will absorb. Bull-Meat-Brand Sausage Binder, in the proportion given in the above formula, will make a very different Head Cheese from what can be made with some of the other Binders on the market.

It will pay sausage makers to use B. Heller & Co.’s Genuine Bull-Meat-Brand Sausage Binder instead of any of the imitations now on the market. None of the other Binders that we have tested in our laboratory will prove as satisfactory as Bull-Meat-Brand Sausage Binder.

If the Butcher uses the best of ingredients and follows the proper methods, he is bound to make the best products; but the most careful sausage maker cannot make fine products unless he uses good material.

Ninth:—After the Head Cheese Meat, Bull-Meat-Brand Sausage Binder and water in which the Heads have been boiled are mixed as above directed, stuff in Beef Bungs or Hog Stomachs and boil in water 155 degrees hot until they are cooked through. This will require from one to one and one-half hours, depending upon the thickness.

Tenth:—When cooked, remove from the kettle and place in cold water until they are partly cooled; then lay them on boards and press them down by putting boards over the Head Cheese with weights on them. Head Cheese is sometimes smoked after it is pressed.

Eleventh:—If they are not smoked, rub them with White Berliner Brand Konservirung Salt in order to prevent them from getting slimy. 

 

CURING MEATS FOR LIVER SAUSAGE

Good Liver Sausage should always contain a certain amount of Meat and Fat in addition to the Liver. This Fat and Meat should be cured for a week or two, before making the Sausage, in a brine made as follows:

1 lb. Freeze-Em-Pickle.
7 lbs. Salt.
5 gals. of Water.

Liver Sausage made from Meat that has been cured in this manner will keep much better after it is made. Where it is necessary to ship Liver Sausage any great distance or to keep it on hand any length of time after it has been made, the Livers should also be cured in the above brine for two weeks before making the Sausage.

The best way to cure the Livers for this purpose is to cut them into strips after they have been chilled for 24 hours and then put them into the brine to cure. Packers who must ship Liver Sausage during the summer months will find the above directions in making Liver Sausage very valuable.

 

DIRECTIONS FOR MAKING LIVER SAUSAGE

Take 70 lbs. of Hog Livers, 25 lbs. of Pork Necks; the entire Boned Head can be used instead of the Necks, or the trimmings which are cut from Bellies will work into Liver Sausage very nicely.

First:—Scald the Livers by pouring boiling hot water over them or dipping them into boiling water until they are scalded through to the center. Then throw them into the ice water or put them into a tub of cold water and allow the water to run into the tub until the Livers are cooled through to the center, otherwise, they might sour in a short time. 

Second:—Cook the Hog Necks, Heads, or Bellies and remove all the meat from the bone.

Third:—Chop the meat as fine as possible. When an Enterprise Grinder is used, grind the meat as fine as it can be ground through a fine plate; then add the Livers, which have also been ground as fine as it is possible to get them. The finer and better the Livers and Fat are ground, the finer and better will be the Liver Sausage.

Fourth:—When grinding, add to 100 lbs. of Sausage:

3 large-size Onions.
Bull-Meat-Brand Sausage Binder in percentage proportion of cereal as allowed by your State Pure Food Law.
6 to 8 ozs. of Zanzibar-Brand Liver Sausage Seasoning.
1 lb. “A” Condimentine.

All of these should then be well mixed, and as much of the Water in which the Meat was boiled should be added to the mixture as the Meat will absorb.

Fifth:—Stuff very loosely into Hog Bungs or Beef Casings, and boil very slowly, otherwise, they will burst; never have the water hotter than 155 degrees. The length of time to boil is ½ to 1 hour, which will depend entirely upon the thickness of the Sausage.

Sixth:—After they are boiled, place in ice water, in which they should be kept until they have been chilled through to the center; then remove them from the water and place them in the cooler. After the Sausages are chilled rub the casings with some White Berliner Brand Konservirung Salt, to prevent the Sausage from getting slimy.

 

DIRECTIONS FOR MAKING BRAUNSCHWEIGER LIVER SAUSAGE

Braunschweiger Liver Sausage is made of neck pieces from Lean Hogs, Hog Livers, Gut Fat, Trimmings from Bellies, and Back Fat, all of which must be steamed before being chopped. For 150 lbs., or less amounts in the same proportion, take:

10 lbs. Gut Fat.
30 lbs. of Belly Trimmings.
20 lbs. of Back Fat.
40 lbs. of Neck Pieces.
50 lbs. of Hog Livers.

First:—Take the above quantities, put them into a kettle and steam them at about 180 degrees or 190 degrees until the meat is tender. Care must be taken 136 that the water does not boil. It should not be hotter than 190 degrees or just enough heated to make it simmer.

Second:—Separate the Livers from the other Meat that has been steamed and chop it or grind it fine.

Third:—Take all of the other Meat out of the kettle, strip it from the bones and rinds, put it in a chopper or grinder, and chop, rock or grind fine. The finer the better. While chopping add:

5 large-size Onions.
The Bull-Meat-Brand Flour.
10 to 12 ozs. Zanzibar Brand Liver Sausage Seasoning.
1 lb. “A” Condimentine, and as much of the Soup in which the Meat was steamed as the Meat will absorb.

Fourth:—Then put all of the chopped Meat, including the Livers, into a trough and mix all the Meat thoroughly, adding as much more of the Soup while mixing, as the mixture will absorb.

Fifth:—Stuff loosely into Hog Middles or Hog Bungs, and boil very slowly, otherwise, they will burst; boil them until they are filled and swell out. Never have the water hotter than 155 degrees. The length of time to boil is ½ to 1½ hours, which will depend entirely upon the thickness of the Sausage.

Sixth:—After they are boiled, place in cold water—ice water is the best—in which they should be kept until they have been chilled through to the center, but while chilling the Sausages must be turned frequently to keep the grease from congealing to one side; then remove from the water, and place in a cooler.

After the Sausages are chilled, rub the casings with some White Berliner Brand Konservirung Salt, to prevent the Sausage from getting slimy.

Seventh:—If it is desired to smoke the Braunschweiger Liver Sausage it can be smoked the following day.

 

SMOKED COLORED LIVER SAUSAGE

Color the casings in a solution of our Zanzibar-Carbon Brand Casing Yellow Mixture by momentary dipping before watering, cutting, and tying them. This will give Liver Sausage the desired smoke shade color. 

 

BLOOD SAUSAGE

Blood Sausage is always made from partially Cured Meat. This Meat should be cured for 10 to 14 days in a brine made as follows:

1 lb. Freeze-Em-Pickle.
7 lbs. Salt.
5 gals. Water.

Blood Sausage made from Meat that has been cured by the Freeze-Em-Pickle Process will have a delicious flavor and will keep well in any climate.

Use Bull-Meat-Brand Sausage Binder, in percentage proportion of cereal allowed by your State Food Law, in making Blood Sausage, as it tends to absorb fat and meat juices, preventing the Sausage from drying out so readily and becoming unpalatable.

 

TONGUE BLOOD SAUSAGE

Tongue Blood Sausage is made the same as either Formula No. 1 or Formula No. 2, with the exception that Cured Hog Tongues are added to it. The more Tongues used, the better will be the sausage.

Always use Tongues that have been thoroughly cured by the Freeze-Em-Pickle Process as they will have a nice red appearance in the Sausage. Boil the Tongues until they are done and then cut into strips and mix into the sausage at the same time as the blood is added. 

 

DIRECTIONS FOR MAKING BLOOD SAUSAGE

To make 100 lbs. of Blood Sausage, use the following proportions which we will call Formula No. 1:

20 lbs. of Cheek Meat, either fresh or salted.
15 lbs. of Hearts, either fresh or salted.
15 lbs. of Pork Rinds, either fresh or salted.
20 lbs. of Pork Speck (back fat), either fresh or salted.
25 lbs. (3 gallons) of Hog or Beef Blood.
Bull-Meat-Brand Sausage Binder in percentage proportion of cereal as allowed by your State Pure Food Law.
6 to 8 ozs. Zanzibar-Brand Blood Sausage Flavor.
½ lb. “B” Condimentine.
2 lbs. of Salt, to suit taste.
½ lb. Freeze-Em-Pickle.

Salted Meat is preferable in making Blood Sausage but fresh Meat can be used if desired.

First:—Take 25 lbs. of Fresh Hog or Beef Blood, and stir until the blood remains thin and will not congeal.

Second:—Put the Pork Rinds in a pudding net and boil until about three-quarters done. Care must be taken not to boil them too long, otherwise, they will become too pulpy when boiled the second time in the Sausage.

Third:—Boil the Cheek Meat and Hearts until done. The Cheek Meat and Hearts should be boiled as slowly as possible. The slower the boiling the better will be the Sausage.

Fourth:—After they are cooked, put the Pork Rinds in a chopper or meat grinder and cut them as fine as possible. The finer the better. After the Cheek Meat and Hearts have been cooked, they should be cut up coarse by hand, or chopped coarsely in a chopper.

Fifth:—The Pork Back Fat must be scalded by pouring boiling water over it for a few minutes. It should then be cut into small squares or cubes by hand or with a pork back fat cutting machine. 

Sixth:—After the Meat and Fat are all cut, add to it:

25 lbs. of Beef Blood.
The legal amount of Bull-Meat-Brand Sausage Binder.
6 to 8 ozs. Zanzibar Brand Blood Sausage Seasoning.
Salt to suit taste.

Seventh:—Mix these thoroughly and stuff into Beef Bungs, Beef Middles or Rounds. Fill the casings only three-quarters full.

Eighth:—Blood Sausage should be boiled very slowly, the water should not be hotter than 155 degrees. The length of time for boiling depends entirely upon the thickness of the Sausage. When done, the Sausage will float on top of the water and will be firm and plump. It will be necessary to prick the Casings when boiling to let out the air.

Ninth:—When the Sausage is cooked through, remove it from the kettle and place it in cold water; ice water is the best. Allow it to remain in this cold water until it is thoroughly cooled. Then, place it on a board in a cooler and allow it to remain there 24 hours before cutting.

Tenth:—It is always advisable to use pickled or dry-salt cured Cheek Meat and Hearts for Blood Sausage instead of fresh ones.

To cure them especially for Blood Sausage, they should be cured in brine made with Freeze-Em-Pickle according to directions in the first paragraph of this article, for two weeks before being made into Sausage. Some prefer to grind the Hearts fine and leave the Cheeks coarse, and if this is preferred, the Hearts can be ground with the Pork Rinds.

Formula No. 2, for making 100 lbs. of Blood Sausage:

30 lbs. of Pork Speck (back fat).
35 lbs. of Pork Snouts or Ears.
30 lbs. of Hog or Beef Blood.
Bull-Meat-Brand Sausage Binder in the percentage proportion of cereal as allowed by your State Pure Food Law.
6 to 8 ozs. Zanzibar-Brand Blood Sausage Flavor.
½ lb. “B” Condimentine.
½ lb. of Freeze-Em-Pickle.
2 lbs. Salt.

Cook and handle Formula No. 2 the same as Formula No. 1, with the exception of leaving out the Hearts and Cheek Meat. 

 

DIRECTIONS FOR MAKING SUMMER SAUSAGE (CERVELAT)

Use 70 lbs. of Pork Trimmings, 20 lbs. of Lean Beef, 10 lbs. of Pork Back Fat.

First:—Before being made into Sausage, the Back Fat must first be dry salted for two weeks in order to get it properly cured and firm.

Second:—After the Pork Back Fat has been dry salt-cured, it should be cut up into small pieces of about one-half inch square.

Third:—The Beef should be first finely chopped; then the Pork Trimmings should be added and then the Pork Back Fat. The meat should be chopped until fine and while it is being chopped add:

2 lbs. of Salt.
½ lb. “B” Condimentine.
8 ozs. Best Granulated Sugar.
10 to 12 ozs. Zanzibar-Brand Summer Sausage Seasoning.
Bull-Meat-Brand Sausage Binder in percentage proportion of cereal as allowed by your State Pure Food Law.

Fourth:—When the Meat is chopped, it should be packed tightly in pans or boxes which should be placed in a cooler having a temperature of about 40 degrees; these pans or boxes should hold about 50 lbs. and should be shallow, not over six to eight inches deep, so that the Meat can be thoroughly chilled through.

The Meat in these pans or boxes should remain in the cooler from four to six days before it will be ready to stuff into the Casings.

Fifth:—Stuff the Sausage into Hog Bung Casings or Beef Middle Casings and hang them in a dry room at a temperature of about 45 to 50 degrees for two or three weeks.

Sixth:—They can then be smoked and are ready for the market.

 

DIRECTIONS FOR MAKING ITALIAN STYLE SALAMI SAUSAGE

Take 60 lbs. of Pork Trimmings.
20 lbs. Lean Beef.
20 lbs. Pork Back Fat.
Bull-Meat-Brand Sausage Binder in percentage proportion of cereal allowed by your State Pure Food Law.
1 lb. of Freeze-Em-Pickle.
¾ lb. of “B” Condimentine.
8 ozs. of Granulated Sugar.
2 lbs. of Salt.
10 to 12 ozs. of Zanzibar-Brand Summer Sausage Flavor.
2 to 3 ozs. of Vacuum-Brand Garlic Compound or Garlic Condiment.

First:—Before being made into sausage, the Back Fat must first be dry salted for two weeks to get it properly cured and firm.

Second:—Chop Pork Trimmings and Beef quite coarse, coarser than for Summer Sausage. While chopping add the Bull-Meat-Brand Sausage Binder, Freeze-Em-Pickle, Salt, Sugar, Seasoning, “B” Condimentine and Garlic Compound or Garlic Condiment, and when it is partly chopped add the Back Fat which has previously been cut in cubes about a one-half inch square.

By adding the Back Fat last it will still be in quite large pieces when the Meat is sufficiently chopped.

The Fat should show quite prominently in Salami, as it must be fatter than Summer Sausage. Two or three ounces of Vacuum-Brand Garlic Compound or Garlic Condiment should be added while being chopped to give it a delicious Garlic flavor. The quantity may be varied according to the demands of the trade.

Third:—When the Meat is chopped, it should be packed tightly in pans or boxes, which should be placed in a cooler having a temperature of about 40 degrees.

These pans or boxes should hold about 50 lbs. and should be shallow, not over six to eight inches deep, so that the Meat can be thoroughly chilled through. The Meat in these pans should remain in the cooler from four to six days before it will be ready to stuff into Casings.

Fourth:—Stuff the Sausage into Hog Bung Casings or Beef Middle Casings and hang them in a dry room at a temperature of about 45 to 50 degrees 142 for two or three days, then wrap twine around them nicely as shown in cut and again hang up to dry for two to three weeks.

Fifth:—They can then be smoked with cool smoke made with hardwood sawdust only. Wood makes too much heat. Then they are ready for the market.

 

DIRECTIONS FOR MAKING HOLSTEIN STYLE SAUSAGE

Take 50 lbs. of Pork Trimmings.
40 lbs. of Beef Trimmings.
10 lbs. of Pork Back Fat.

First:—Before being made into Sausage, the Back Fat must first be dry-salted for two weeks in order to get it properly cured and firm.

Second:—Put the Beef into the chopping machine and while chopping it add:

2 lbs. of Salt.
¾ lb. “B” Condimentine.
1 lb. of Freeze-Em-Pickle.
8 oz. of Best Granulated Sugar.
Bull-Meat-Brand Sausage Binder in percentage proportion of cereal as allowed by your State Pure Food Law.
1 small teaspoonful of Vacuum-Brand Garlic Compound or Garlic Condiment.

Let the Beef chop until about one-half done before adding the Pork; then chop the Pork and Beef some before adding the square-cut pieces of Pork Back Fat.

Third:—After the Meat is chopped and spiced put it in shallow boxes or pans not over eight inches thick, and put it in a good cooler. Keep the Meat in a cooler for from 4 to 6 days so it is thoroughly cured before it is stuffed.

Fourth:—Stuff in Beef Round Casings and let the Sausage hang in a dry room at 45 to 50 degrees of temperature for a week.

Fifth:—Then give them a good smoke and they are ready for the market. Cool smoke is produced with hickory, hard maple or oak sawdust only. Wood gives off too much heat. 

 

HOW TO COLOR THE CASINGS FOR HOLSTEIN STYLE SAUSAGE

See directions for momentary dipping. This method can be used equally well on empty casings. After the casings have a light orange color take them out of the solution and wash them well in hot water, cut and tie them, then stuff the casings and hang the sausage up to dry.

After the sausage has hung a week or two and is dry, hang it in the smokehouse for a few days to give it a smoky flavor and it is ready for shipment. This will save a large shrinkage and the sausage will have a better appearance.

Sausage that has had the casing colored before being stuffed need not become rancid, as it is not exposed to the heat in a smokehouse, which heat always causes the stearin and oil in the fat to separate, and as soon as this change takes place the sausage begins to become rancid.

 

SWEDISH STYLE SAUSAGE

Take 60 lbs. of Beef. (Boneless Chucks, Briskets, and Shank Meat can be used.)
30 lbs. of Pork Ham Trimmings.
10 lbs. of Back Fat.

First:—Before being made into Sausage, the Back Fat must first be dry-salted for two weeks in order to get it properly cured and firm.

Second:—Cut up the Pork Back Fat into square half-inch cubes by hand or with a Pork Back Fat Cutting Machine.

Third:—Put the Beef and Pork on the block and when partly or coarsely chopped add the cubes of Back Fat, and when the Beef and Pork are cut fine, the Pork Back Fat should show prominently through the meat.

While it is being chopped add:

2 lbs. of Salt.
¾ lb. “B” Condimentine.
Bull-Meat-Brand Sausage Binder in percentage proportion of cereal as allowed by your State Pure Food Law.
1 lb. Freeze-Em-Pickle.
8 ozs. Best Granulated Sugar.
10 to 12 ozs. Zanzibar-Brand Swedish Style Sausage Seasoning.

Fourth:—After chopping fine, put the Meat in a trough and knead it with the Bull-Meat-Brand Sausage Binder until it is tight and hard.

Fifth:—Pack the Meat tightly in 50 lb. pans or boxes place in a cooler having a temperature of about 40 degrees; these pans or boxes should be shallow, not over 6 to 8 inches deep, so that the Meat can be thoroughly chilled through. The Meat in these pans or boxes should remain in the cooler 4 to 6 days before it will be ready to stuff into the Casings.

Sixth:—Stuff the Sausage into Beef Middles and hang them in a dry room in a temperature of about 45 to 50 degrees for two or three weeks.

Seventh:—They can then be smoked with cool smoke made with sawdust and are ready for the market.

 

HOW TO COLOR THE CASINGS FOR SWEDISH STYLE METWURST

See directions for momentary dipping. This method can be used equally well on empty casings. After the casings have a light orange color take them out of the solution and wash them well in hot water, cut and tie them.

After the Sausage has hung a week or two and is dry, hang it in the smokehouse for a few days to give it a smoky flavor and it is ready for shipment. This will save a large shrinkage and the Sausage will have a better appearance.

Sausage that has had the casing colored before being stuffed need not become rancid, as it is not exposed to the heat in a smokehouse, which heats often causes the stearin and oil in the fat to separate, and as soon as this change takes place the sausage begins to become rancid.

 

DIRECTIONS FOR MAKING POLISH-STYLE SAUSAGE

Take: 50 lbs of Pork Trimmings
40 lbs. of Beef Trimmings
10 lbs. of Pork Back Fat

Before being used in the Sausage, the Pork Back Fat should be dry-salt cured for at least two weeks or it can be cut from dry salt sides.

First:—Cut up the Pork Back Fat into square half-inch cubes by hand or with a Pork Back Fat Cutting Machine.

Second:—Chop the Pork Trimmings, Beef Trimmings and Pork Back Fat quite coarse, and while being chopped add:

2 lbs. Salt.
¾ lbs. “B” Condimentine.
1 lb. of Freeze-Em-Pickle.
10 to 12 ozs. Zanzibar-Brand Polish Style Sausage Seasoning.
8 ozs. of Granulated Sugar.
2 to 3 ozs. Vacuum Garlic Compound or Garlic Condiment.
Bull-Meat-Brand Sausage Binder in percentage proportion of cereal as allowed by your State Pure Food Law.

Third:—After the Pork Trimmings and Pork Back Fat have been chopped and mixed with the Salt, “B” Condimentine, Bull-Meat-Brand Sausage Binder, Freeze-Em-Pickle and Vacuum Brand Garlic, stuff into beef round casings.

Fourth:—After the sausage has been stuffed into casings place them in the smokehouse and thoroughly smoke with wood. This Polish Style Sausage should not be boiled when made. It is boiled when eaten. 

 

HOW TO COLOR THE CASINGS FOR POLISH-STYLE SAUSAGE

See directions for momentary dipping. This method will work equally well on empty casings. After the casings have a light orange color take them out of the solution and wash them well in hot water, cut and tie them.

After the Polish Style Sausage is stuffed, hang it in the smokehouse for a few hours, using wood so as to have a hot smoke. This drys it and gives it a smoky flavor. Then it is ready for shipment. This will save a large shrinkage and the sausage will have a better appearance.

Polish Style Sausage that has had the casing colored before being stuffed need not become rancid, as it is not exposed to so much heat in a smokehouse, which heat always causes the stearin and oil in the fat to separate, and as soon as this change takes place the sausage begins to become rancid.

 

HOW TO MAKE FINE QUALITY BOCKWURST

First:—Take 45 pounds Beef, 20 pounds Veal, 20 pounds Lean Pork, 5 pounds Pork Back Fat (Speck).

Second:—The Meat should all be chopped very fine except the Speck, which should first be cut into small cubes and then added to the rest of the Meat when it is partly chopped so that small cubes of fat will show in the Sausage.

Third:—While chopping, add the following:

Bull-Meat-Brand Sausage Binder in percentage proportion of cereal as allowed by your State Pure Food Law.
½ lb. of Freeze-Em-Pickle.
¾ lb. “B” Condimentine.
1½ to 2 lbs. of Salt.
8 to 10 ozs. of Zanzibar-Brand Frankfurt Sausage Seasoning.
3 tablespoonfuls of very finely cut Chives.
6 heaping tablespoonfuls of finely chopped Parsley.
Sufficient artificial ice to keep the meat cool while grinding is added a little at a time.

Fourth:—When the meat is all cut up fine and properly mixed with the spice, it should be stuffed in Narrow Sheep Casings and turned off in links about 2½ inches long.

Fifth:—As a rule, Bockwurst is sold without smoking, but it can be given a light smoke if desired.

Sixth:—To prepare Bockwurst for the table, it should be steamed for five or six minutes in hot water. 

 

KEEPING SAUSAGE IN WARM WEATHER

Pork Sausage, Bologna, Frankforts, Head Cheese, Liver Sausage, etc., can be kept in a good condition, by simply putting them, every night, in a solution of 1 lb. of Cold-Storine dissolved in three gallons of water. This solution should be kept in the Cooler. In the morning remove the Sausage from the solution, hang it up and expose it for sale, and what remains unsold in the evening, simply put back in the brine for the night.

In this way, Sausage can be kept fresh and nice appearing for some time, and it will not shrink and dry up. This enables the dealer to keep a large, attractive display on hand in his shop without any danger of the goods spoiling.

By keeping the Sausage in this way, it does not dry out, nor become slimy or moldy as it would if hung up in the cooler. Sausage can also be shipped a reasonable distance in a Cold-Storine solution to better advantage than if shipped in any other way.

On arrival, it should be removed from the solution, hung up, and allowed to drain and dry. In the evening it should be replaced in the same solution for keeping overnight.

Never put Smoked Sausage and Fresh Sausage in the same solution. Each kind of Sausage should be kept in a separate solution.

 


Meat Curing Sausage Making links:

Meat Curing – Part 1
General Hints For Curing Meats – Part 2
Hints For Handling Of Meats – Part 3
Sausage Making – Part 4
Meat Curing Sausage Making Q&A (a) – Part 5
Meat Curing Sausage Making Q&A (b) – Part 6
Meat Curing Sausage Making Products – Part 7